Reaching out to members that bounce – feedback wanted


(Sarah Hawk) #1

In my community (not this one) we have a good new user – first post conversion rate, but then we see a drop off and I’d like to try and figure out why.

My plan is to contact users by email to try and dig into what is causing them to bounce. I haven’t had great success with this kind of approach in the past (with other communities) – persuasive writing isn’t my strength.

I’ve drafted this email but I think it could be better. Does anyone have thoughts or feedback?

Hi [member],
I really enjoyed reading your introduction post earlier this year. You haven’t been back since and I’m interested in why. I’d love to improve the new member experience – whether for you or others in a similar position.

Was there a sticking point that stopped you from returning (either tech related or otherwise)?

Our goal at UX Mastery is to make a difference to UXers and we need your help to make a real impact.

Any insight you can offer, no matter how brief, will be both helpful and gratefully accepted.

Thanks.


(Bas van Leeuwen) #2

Sounds like a really good thing to explore!

Do you have the time to personalize it?
If I get an “I really likes XYZ” without an indication that the person actually “Really likes XYZ”, it comes across as insincere marketing automation :slight_smile:


(Sarah Hawk) #3

Yeah, I do plan to send them individually from my poem email address so personalization is doable. What would make you stand up and listen? (Or respond)?


(Alessio Fattorini) #4

Do you want to know or do you want to re-engage? It’s not easy to know the reasons…people have to expose themselves
Honestly, my advice is “Don’t ask” :slight_smile: as Rich repeats Give them something to do! Something where they can show their expertise.
Don’t ask why they have disappeared, give them a reason to re-engage :slight_smile:


(Sarah Hawk) #5

I want to know.

I think asking is really important, because there might be something that I am missing, either technological or psychological (i.e. they feel daunted, or they feel overwhelmed). In this case, giving them something to do feels like trying to catch a drip, rather than fix the leak.


(Sarah Hawk) #6

I’ve tweaked this to take out the negatively loaded sentence “You haven’t been back…” and to add in an appeal to the audience “I’m doing my research” (the entire premise of UX is based around user research).

Hi [member],
I really enjoyed reading your introduction post earlier this year. I’d love to improve the new member experience – whether for you or others in a similar position so I’m doing my research!

Was there a sticking point that stopped you from returning (either tech related or otherwise) after your introduction post?

Our goal at UX Mastery is to make a difference to UXers and we need your help to make a real impact.

Any insight you can offer, no matter how brief, will be both helpful and gratefully accepted.

Thanks.


(Bas van Leeuwen) #7

A genuine interest, and I think you are showing that, so you should be fine :slight_smile:


(Caleb Love) #8

The message still appears to be focused on your needs. You are asking someone that is already not participating to help you rather than you offering value to them. ex. “hey, remember that one time we hung out, it was fun… can I borrow 20 bucks.” (bad example but you get the point)

We have run into the similar problem with our Facebook groups in the past. In our welcome message we encourage them to share what they are researching or ask their question… our goal is not just to do something but to get an understanding of what they care about. Often people will post just to ask their question about a particular locality or topic and then we don’t hear back.

So now, whenever we organize a chat, or post a resource, or see a discussion related to that specific topic, we send a private message to many of those inactive that had been interested in that topic but dropped off the map. Saying something like:

“Hey ____________________

“Lately inside our group, we have been trying to add more value to our community members than just waiting for them to get stuck. So when we occasionally come across something that we think might be useful to them we want to make sure they can see and participate in it. I noticed a while back that you were interested in ___________________ and thought this (discussion, event, resource) might be helpful to you.”

Link: ______________________________

Is this the type of (conversation, event, resource) you like to participate in or is there another type that would be helpful in the future?”

This type of message has actually been very helpful for us. I guess it really just depends on what you want to get out of the message though. Feedback from a lost cause or hail Mary attempt at re-engagement. :slight_smile:


(Sarah Hawk) #9

Awesome feedback thanks Caleb.

This interests me because a couple of you have said it. I think it touches on something that CMs do a lot and probably shouldn’t. IMO trying to re-engage people is not good use of my time. It would be better spent figuring out what stopped them from being engaged in the first place. If the systems are set up correctly and the concept is right, it shouldn’t take lots of intervention from me.

So given that, my goal is very much about feedback so that I can change the experience for others in the future.


(Kristen Gastaldo) #10

I’m with you on this. I have a TON of people who join and never post. Or post once, get an answer (we have a good response rate), but never post again.

I started with a new personalized welcome email that asks them to contribute to some low-hanging fruit topics.

But I’m curious to start with a “haven’t seen you in a while. where’d you go?” type email. I’m legitimately curious!


(Caleb Love) #11

Sorry, my comments sometimes come across a little too tongue-in-cheek. I totally agree with you. Most of the time it is a waste of time to reach out to the less actives unless you have something for them that they really care about. What I was trying to say before is that I have generally found that the reason people who aren’t participating often don’t give feedback is because we haven’t pushed their right motivation button.
If I don’t care enough to participate in a group, what is going to make me want to take the time to give them feedback? I once tried that tactic in a community we organized where we decided to send a personalized private message requesting feedback to improve their experience to around 2000 less actives. We received 10-20 responses total.
The way we do it now, 1. identifying up front what their interests are from the first post, 2. sending them relevant ways to engage based on the previous information learned 3. Asking for feedback on the backend of our message, we have seen large increases in participation from those that just got busy or forgot about us, and a lot more feedback from others.


(Sarah Hawk) #12

Not at all – I understood you.

I just wanted to make sure I was communicating my motivations clearly.

I appreciate your input and I agree with you.

I’ll report back on my progress.


(Piper_Wilson) #13

I think that this paragraph comes out of the blue in a not happy way. I understand what you’re going for when you removed the ‘negative’ part but, for me, this now reads like you’ve given up on them coming back at all.

I like the one you sent me. I don’t want to post it without your permission, so I’m going to paraphrase it.

Hey there, I’m looking through stuff and noticed you haven’t been around. How are you doing? Are you still ______ ? …

It’s short and welcoming. Then you can add on the part about wondering if there was an issue that’s kept them away and the rest of it.

I agree with you that trying to re-engage people isn’t generally going to reap a whole lot of return, but if you’re going to reach out for something anyway, go big or go home. I hope that makes sense.


(Sarah Hawk) #14

Go for it. :slight_smile:


(Piper_Wilson) #15

Hi Piper,
I was scouring through some old threads earlier and noticed that we haven’t seen you round this place for quite a while now – and we haven’t heard from you for over a year!

Are you still at FetLife? Any exciting new challenges on the horizon?

It would be great to hear from you,
Sarah.